Tag Archives: art

Graph Paper Doodles Come To Life In Mesmerizing GIFs

17 Sep

So we have all been there, sat in maths class, not really understanding whats going on and doodling on our graph paper. Well this artist has taken it a step further and animated the doodles. They are so different to the other GIF’s I have looked at which is one of the reasons I like them. (Give the GIFs a few minutes to work if not click on the image and they should come to life)

Taken from fastcodesign.com

ALMA ALLORO’S GIFS UPDATE THE ENDURING MATH CLASS PASTIME FOR THE INTERNET AGE.

In addition to being an ideal vehicle for pet follies and YouTube pratfalls, animated GIFs have emerged as a versatile new medium for visual art in the Internet age. Art GIFs–as opposed to, I guess, “LOL GIFs?”–run the gamut from simple optical illusions and early Internet kitsch to theevocative Cinemagrams that set the Internet on fire for a few days last year. Alma Alloro’s GIFs fall somewhere in between, serving as a commentary on the relationship between analog and digital media–and also just giving you something cool looking to zone out to while you eat your lunch at your desk.

 

The collection, Further Abstracts, shows geometric doodles sliding and spinning with life on plain old graph paper. It’s basically what every day-dreaming trig student wishes would happen with his time-wasting sketches. In fact, that was more or less Alloro’s impulse for creating them.

“I made many still image drawings in the same style before,” the Tel Aviv-born artist told Co.Design, “and was curious to see what it would look like in animation.” But in addition to being relatively high quality and easy to disseminate, Alloro thinks GIFs represent a new kind of frontier in visual art–something related to but separate from its older sibling, video art. “Video ‬art began as a comment on cinema‫,‬ and I think it was never capable to become free from that role,” Alloro explained. “Now‫,‬ when videos occupy about 50‫%‬ of any important biennial, it seems like GIFs are replacing video-art and becoming the new avant-garde ‫.‬.. It is also part of this new trend to bring the Internet to a gallery space and vice versa.”

 

As if to prove her point, Alloro’s GIFs have been chosen for exhibition at the Caesura Gallery, an online-only collection that places some (relatively) traditional visual pieces, like a set of photographs of cleverly Photoshopped beer cans, alongside some more novel web-based works. Jesse Darling’s Menetekel (2012, Spray paint, animated GIF), another piece on the site, wins the award for collapsing the most media in the shortest amount of time: The work is a 7-second animated GIF of a hooded figure spray painting the Twitter hashtag #IRL on a brick wall, in real life. Basically, Alloro’s GIFs–a timeless analog time waster presented in the Internet’s freshest time wasting file format–are right at home.

Furthering their artistic bona fides, GIFs have even been accompanied by some jargon-heavy explicatory text. Alloro’s friend and fellow artist Gabriel S. Moses writes, “Alloro revives the Bauhaus movement’s celebrated core symbols (the triangle, square, and circle), only to subvert their refined ideology of functional beauty. Replacing iconic solid colors with a hyper-saturated radiance, the bare technical grid-aesthetics of these corrupted Bauhaus designs render the modern myth of functionality obsolete.”

He’s not kidding, Alloro insists, but she does admit she didn’t have much of that in mind when she was making the GIFs. “It’s nice not to over-analyze your own works,” she told Co.Design. “Let someone else do that.”

Check out the rest of the Further Abstracts GIFs at the Caesura Gallery.

 

 

 

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Taking Photoshop’s Curves Beyond Highlights and Shadows

13 Sep

I dont know about you but I have never been able to get to grips with curves. Artist’s produce amazing pieces using curves and mastering them. Here is an article I sought out for you guys and me, to help us get our heads around them and what they can do. Hope it helps you 🙂

Taken from webdesignerdepot.com

photoshop curves control

Photoshop’s Curves is a flexible control that can brighten or darken parts of a layer based on the layer’s luminosity.

Editing tones in an image—not just grays and not always photos—can do more than fix highlights and shadows.

Curves can be used to edit photos, masks, graphics and even hues. But using it requires a little know-how and imagination.

Read on for more details about what Photoshop curves are, as well as how to use them properly for your designs.

 

Making Tonal Adjustments

Curves is found near the top of the Image → Adjustments menu. Its most obvious use is to adjust contrast in an image, and it is intuitive enough that most users need to study it only for a minute or so before catching on.

examples of simple tonal adjustments

Above: Drag a point on the curve line up to make the image brighter and down to make it darker. But what does that mean?

Curves uses a grid that shows before and after. The horizontal axis indicates original tones, and the vertical axis indicates how they will change. A diagonal line bisects the grid. Dragging points away from the diagonal line will brighten or darken highlights and shadows depending on where the change happens.

diagram of Curves grid, before and after

Above, the curve turns shadows into bright highlights, muddies mid-tones and turns the original white point into middle gray. The further the curve moves away from the diagonal line, the more extreme the change will be. It also means that the angle of the curve changes the image’s contrast in a given range of tones.

examples of how the slope affects contrast

Above, blue denotes which tones most of the pixels use. Red denotes the slope.

  1. Most of the tones are just to the left of mid-gray, so creating a steep angle in that area would give most of the image more contrast.
  2. The opposite—giving the mid-tones a flat slope—lowers the contrast.
  3. Creating a steep slope away from the popular tones creates extreme contrast: many shadows, some highlights and few mid-tones.

 

Choose Tones to Change With Curves

Unlike Levels, Curves allows changes to a select range of tones. Not only can shadows, mid-tones and highlights be changed, they can be changed independently.

examples of selective tonal changes

Two variations on the photo above show how Curves can affect different areas. In the center photo, pixels brighter than 50% are all brightened. But only the highest highlights—and darkest shadows—are brightened in the right-most image.

To add a point to the Curves line, simply click the line. To remove a point, drag it off the grid.

The Curves control isn’t limited to photos. For example, the logo below has a subtle texture—but what if “subtle” isn’t the right look?

example of a logo with more contrast via Curves

Above, a change in Curves brings out the texture in the disc and amplifies the sheen on the bolt. Knowing that Curves can be used beyond fixing tones and can be used in photos is the first step to grasping its hidden features.

 

Playing With Color

The Curves control hides many features in plain sight. One of these is the ability to color-correct (or cross-process) any digital image.

illustration showing where the RGB options reside

Above: with a drop-down menu above the grid, the user can edit one channel (red, green or blue in RGB images) at a time.

example of using Curves alter a photo's color

The photo above was given a color cast by warming its shadows and cooling its highlights. Specifically, red is removed from the shadows but added to the highlights, and vice versa for blue and green.

example of using Curves to tint a photo

A grayscale version of the same photo becomes a duotone when we use Curves to adjusts its channels. Above, extra red and green warm the highlights and mid-tones, while the shadows take on a bluish tinge. In Curves, channels often don’t require major changes to alter an image dramatically.

 

Improving Selections

Selections and masks in Photoshop aren’t simply on-or-off features, but rather a range of values—much like a gradient. And masks, like gradients, can be manipulated with Curves.

step-by-step 1

We want to screen the red image behind the black text but leave details at the edges. We start by adding a mask to the photo with the layer (above). A layer mask controls the layer’s opacity without erasing its pixels.

step-by-step 2

With a reflected gradient, the mask hides the center of the photo. In layer mask terms, light means more visible and dark means less visible.

step-by-step 3

We make the gradient “shallow” using Curves. If white areas of a mask are visible and black areas are invisible, then the gray is somewhat hidden.

step-by-step 4

The result (above) is a photo that is screened behind text but still visible at the edges. However, the text is still difficult to read.

step-by-step 5

Every time Curves opens, it looks at the mask anew. Above, we lower the white point to make the mask darker and thus less visible.

step-by-step 6

The result is a gently screened photo that fades into the text (above).

 

Secrets of the Curves Control

Curves is full of shortcuts and hidden features. Here are a few useful tidbits:

diagram of hidden features in Curves

Still, the fundamentals haven’t changed since Photoshop 1.0 first arrived on the scene. Many possibilities arise from this simple control.”

How to Optimize Content When You Don’t Know Jack about SEO

13 Sep

Ok so here are some more tips on mastering the art of SEO 🙂 hope it helps

Taken from contentmarketinginstitute.com

“Knowing how to optimize content for search engines is essential, but often easier said than done. After all, mastering the art and science of search engine optimization (SEO) is no small feat.

Frequent updates to Google’s search ranking algorithm — notably Panda and Penguin — only complicate matters. Although such updates go a long way toward enhancing the quality of search results by, for example, discounting the high volumes of low-quality content produced by content farms, they also mean that the best ways to optimize content are constantly evolving.

Simply put, you’ve got to stay on your toes. Fortunately for those of us who aren’t in the habit of analyzing search engine algorithms but still want to optimize content, there are some basic tips that are easy to follow.

In the interest of full disclosure, let me make it clear that I’m in no way, shape, or form an SEO expert. If you’re looking for the definitive word on the subject, there are far more comprehensive resources on the subject (such as this guide by SEOmoz). If, however, you’re new to SEO and are looking for some simple techniques to optimize content for search engines, written in plain language, read on!

How to optimize content: The 411 on keywords

At its most basic, SEO is about tinkering with your content to make it attractive to search engines. One way of doing this is by selecting the right keyword — the word or phrase that people would be most likely to enter into a search engine if they were looking for your content — and then using it throughout what you write. When Google indexes your website, it detects the keywords you’ve used and how you’ve used them, and ranks your content (in part) on that basis. That ranking is what determines if your content shows up on the first page of results when you google the keyword or on the fifty-first.

Of course, not all keywords are created equal. You’ve got to take care in choosing the ones that you’ll have the greatest chances of ranking well for. Many are highly competitive, so vetting your options is essential. Plus, what seems like the right keyword to you, may not be what people actually use to search for content. After all, what good is using “early stage companies” if most people are searching for “start-ups.”

Not to worry. You are not alone in your quest to optimize content. You can consult the free Google Adwords Keyword Tool to get some insights. Type in a potential keyword and the site tells you how many people are searching for it in a given month and how much competition there is, based on advertising spend for sponsored links. Armed with this data, you can do a reasonable job of picking a keyword.

Take this article as an example. Although I’m writing about “search engine optimization,” the keyword tool quickly reveals that it’s not a good choice.

optimize content, keywords, CMI

With more than 600,000 global monthly searches and a competition rating of high, I’ve got no chance of ranking for it. Looking at who is ranking on page one for this keyword — big names (SEOmoz), with sites that drive huge traffic — confirms that assessment.

After experimenting with other options, I discover that “optimize content” is a much better option. It still gets at the same idea as search engine optimization, but has a low competition ranking and garners about 1,900 global searches a month. While there are still some pretty big names on the first page of results for the term, my chances of winding up there too are much greater using “optimize content” than if I selected “search engine optimization” as my keyword.

Now you may be thinking that 1,900 hits a month is nothing compared to 600,000. True enough. However, if you can rank on page 1 for those 1,900 hits and consistently drive a portion of them to your site, you’re going to be much better off than if you rank on page 51 for the 600,000 hits and never get found.

Importantly, it was only after I had “optimize content” as my keyword, that I began writing this article.It’s much easier to create content with a keyword in mind than trying to retrofit it into something you’ve already crafted. All the more so because, as with any keyword, I need to use “optimize content” in context, not just willy-nilly, in order to help my ranking.

For reference, I’ve highlighted my use of my keyword optimize content throughout this article to show you how I used it. Some of the things to keep in mind when incorporating a keyword are to include it in:

  • The title of your content
  • The first sentence of your first paragraph
  • At least one heading within the content
  • The page’s URL
  • The page’s meta description
  • The alternate text field of any images you’ve included

Ultimately, you want to use your keyword enough for it to catch the attention of search engines, while still being sensible. Expert opinions vary, but the general rule of thumb is to aim for a keyword density — the percentage of times the keyword appears in your content compared to the total number of words — of between 1 percent and 3 percent. The keyword density of this article, FYI, is 1.23 percent.

Tip: To learn a lot more about keywords, check out “Better Keywords, Better Customers: A Business Guide to Keyword Generation.”

How to optimize content: other factors

If you’re creating your content in WordPress, consider using the SEO Yoast Tool, which analyzes how SEO-friendly your content is. The tool gives you ratings of green (good to go), yellow (hold up, you can do better), and red (stop, you’re off track!) across a variety of content optimization dimensions. In addition to telling you your keyword density, it checks to see if you’ve included keywords in the places noted above and if you’ve met a host of other guidelines.

The tool also checks out some other important factors that you need to bear in mind as you look tooptimize content. Namely, it looks to ensure that your content:

  • Is at least 300 words in length
  • Contains outbound links
  • Has a relatively short URL
  • Is easy to read, with concise sentences.

When I ran this article through the tool, I got the following result:

optimize content, yoast results, CMI

Overall, I’ve done a good job of optimizing this article for search engines. There are a couple of things I could adjust, but the mostly green lights tell me I’m ready to publish.

To be clear, there is a lot more to ranking well on search engines than optimizing your content. Google also looks at how much your content is shared, how many inbound links it has, and much more with its algorithm. That said, if you don’t know Jack about SEO, the tips above will go a long way toward helping as you look to optimize content!”

A Hyper Cool (And Controversial) Rebranding For American Airlines

13 Sep

Heres another article I found about a rebrand of American Airlines, I love the retro feel of this. The brief was posted on a creative site, open to over 6,000 creatives. So they had their pick of the designs, and could choose what felt right for them. This article concentrates on their favourite, which would definitely be mine too. To see her full range of designs for this click this link:

 http://www.fastcodesign.com/1670588/a-hyper-cool-and-controversial-rebranding-for-american-airlines#1

Taken from fastcodesign.com

“ANNA KÖVECSES WAS PAID $1,000 FOR A PROPOSED REDESIGN OF AMERICAN AIRLINES. IS THAT RIGHT? AND WILL IT REALLY HELP AA DO BETTER?

The “uninvited redesign” has become a fixture on the Internet over the past few years. It perpetuates the perfect symbiotic relationship between designer and audience: People love seeing what Wikipedia or Microsoftmight look like in the hands of a genius, and designers love stretching their legs without the burden of a real client or brief.

It’s even become a way for established agencies to secure work. In 2011, Boulder ad agency Victors & Spoils did a hypothetical rebrand for Harley Davidson that helped them nab the actual gig. And this spring, upon news that American Airlines would file for Chapter 11 bankruptcy, they reached out to AA’s CEO Thomas Horton in much the same way. “We’ve decided to act as if we’re working together already,” wrote CEO John Windsor. “We’ve put this brief to our crowd of 6,000+ creatives–offering $10,000 of our own toward the ideas we think can best help American Airlines become a more nimble airline.”

The invitation has spurred dozens of redesigns. One of the best came from Cyprus-based designer Anna Kövecses, whose no-nonsense, vaguely retro aesthetic lends itself to the company’s historic brand. The concept won the young designer $1,000 from Victors & Spoils, along with valuable media exposure. “My aim was to strip down the AA identity to the core and this meant building down the whole design to match this core as well,” Kövecses says over email. “For me, this core expectation has turned out to be safety. I wanted to design something that makes people feel safe because it visually meets up to the extremely high technology of aviation, the security and flawless on and off board services provided, and reflects the great history and experience behind American Airlines.” In muted greys and blues, set off by a wood grain highlight texture, the boarding pass and website exude a quiet calm. Simple, readable Helvetica signage and subtle nods to AA’s post-War heyday round out the identity.

But Kövecses explains that her vision comes from a deeper consideration of AA’s brand. “I tried to look at the whole problem from a Dieter Rams-inspired point of view and find out what this company is about, what people expect from this company,” she explains over email. “Then visualize exactly that expectation, not less, not more.” It’s no secret that AA is at its worst where customer experience is concerned, a problem they’ve misguidedly tried to solve by launching a series of bizarre standalone sitesthat target women, African Americans, and other minority groups. Kövecses reinvented the website by improving the UI, but also by including a robust user-generated travel blog where customers can swap tips and stories in return for AA bonus points. Travelers can take ownership over the site by registering as a blogger, and connect with friends and fellow tourists. Buying a trip you’ve read about on the blog is the obvious, but not overbearing, end goal. By incentivizing sharing with frequent flier points, AA could cultivate a socially oriented rewards site.

As BuzzFeed’s Russell Brandom pointed out last week, uninvited redesigns are “the frenemies of the web.” And they’re everywhere. But mocking up a slick-looking homepage only takes a few hours. Implementing a design strategy across a sprawling, multi-organization corporation? Not so easy.

That doesn’t mean that such exercises are meritless, of course. Redesigning a big brand is a way to fill out your portfolio, and as Victors & Spoils have demonstrated, a way to grab the attention (and business) of companies that would normally hire elsewhere. What seems troubling, in the grand scheme of things, is how these redesigns are being consumed. In the ecology of the Internet, aesthetics frequently trump content–designers looking for attention in the form of clicks will shoot for something that looks good, rather than something that might solve a more complicated, organization-wide problem.

Such behavior was demonstrated by another young would-be American Airlines designer, who published a public missive against AA that called out their “hideous” site for causing him “horrific displeasure.” To his surprise, a designer within AA reached out to him, hoping to give a little insight into how a multi-armed organization handles their web presence. It was a fascinating, insightful response. “You want a redesign? I’ve got six of them in my archives,” said the mysterious source. “It only takes a few hours to put together a really good-looking one, as you demonstrated in your post. But doing the design isn’t the hard part, and I think that’s what a lot of outsiders don’t really get, probably because many of them actually do belong to small, just-get-it-done organizations.” Unsurprisingly, he was soon fired from his post at AA. On his blog, the designer labeled the AA employee’s response “a cop-out.”

Kövecses’s reimagining does address the company in a deeper way, making it much more successful (and interesting) than some of the other more superficial concepts out there. And unlike many of her peers, she doesn’t have outspoken ambitions to work for AA–for now, she says, it’s simply a chance to show her chops.”

Machine Creates Art Using The ‘DNA’ Of ‘The Perfect Espresso’

13 Sep

This is such a unique way to create art, I dont know how they thought of it. I think it is also a great way to brand a coffee shop, instead of the usual illustrations, this creates individual images depending on the coffee/drink you ordered. So your takeaway coffees have their own personal sleeve. I really like how they have done this!!

Taken from designtaxi.com

For the project ‘The Naked Espresso’ that highlights the features of an espresso machine, Australian ad agency Reborn hacked a Breville Dual Boiler espresso machine to include: an Arduino, flow meters to access espresso flow rate, steam LED to indicate when the steamer was activated on the machine, NTC temperature sensors, and pressure transmitters.

As an espresso gets brewed from the coffee machine, the science behind its making (temperature, flow rate, pressure and steam) gets collected and artistically visualized in a real-time animation.

The speed of the animation is based on the pressure and flow rate of the espresso; its color palette, frequency and variety of shapes, based on the temperature and steam used to make the espresso—making each piece of art one-of-a-kind and a summary of the espresso.

The artistic pieces were printed and attached to coffee cups, to give customers a unique coffee experience and create identifiable coffee cups—even if they all drank the same drink—as they were different based on the visualizations.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shaped By Algorithms, A Solar Powered Pavilion That Soaks Up Maximum Rays

13 Sep

 

This house is like “wow” the design is eye catching and every single part of the house has been designed for that particular place in the environment. It is one of the best solar powered houses created. See what you think.

Taken from fastcodesign.com

“THE ENDESA PAVILION’S PINECONE-LIKE EXTERIOR WAS DESIGNED BY COMPUTER SOFTWARE TO SOAK UP THE PERFECT AMOUNT OF SUNLIGHT.

 

The Endesa Pavilion, also referred to as the Solar House 2.0, sits just off the water at the Olimpic Port in Barcelona. Its jagged facade would be striking in any environment, but the structure wouldn’t really make sense anywhere else. That’s because each of the solar panel-equipped shards comprising its pinecone-like exterior were designed by a piece of software to make optimal use of the sun’s path over that exact location.

The project, headed by Rodrigo Rubio at the Institute for Advanced Architecture of Catalonia, is an incredible example of how we can let sustainability truly inform a structure’s design, instead of just building something and trying to shoehorn in some green niceties after the fact. To start, Rubio gathered data on how the sun traveled across the sky above the Olimpic Port throughout the year. That data was then plugged into a piece of software which used it to determine the optimal size and shape of each module on the Pavilion’s exterior. The result is a structure that’s intimately connected with its surroundings.

And it’s even smarter than it seems on the surface. Each irregular “solar brick” on the Pavilion’s southern facade is outfitted with a photovoltaic panel and positioned not only to collect the optimal amount of sunlight but also to control how much light enters the building, depending on the season. In the winter, when the maximum inclination of the sun is about 30 degrees, the slanting solar bricks allow light in through the windows, heating the house; in the summer, when the maximum inclination is around 70 degrees, the bricks keep the windows shaded and the interior cooled.

On the inside, the jutting solar bricks serve another purpose: storage. By utilizing the compartments for the storage of random stuff, the 1,658-square-foot interior stays uncluttered. The hollow modules also house the light fixtures which illuminate the Pavilion at night.

The Pavilion, which will remain in place for a year as a central hub for Barcelona’s Smart City Congress, was uniquely efficient in its construction, too. In an excellent video on the design of the structure by FairCompanies.com, Rubio explains that he can send files directly from the computer software which created the solar-optimized design to the computerized fabricators, just as simply as you can send text to a printer. “It’s a balance between prefabrication and total customization,” he says. Once the wooden pieces were cut, it took just three weeks of pre-assembly and two weeks on site to erect the building.

 

In that same video, Rubio shows off the control panel inside the Pavilion that monitors its energy use. Even in the summer with the AC pumping, it typically produced more electricity than it was using; he told me it usually runs at about 150% efficiency, generating enough electricity for itself and another small building.

The benefits of a site-optimized structure like the Endesa Pavilion are obvious, and Rubio says the same computer model can be used to create buildings optimized for any region. But this type of design seems particularly well-suited to take one of the major but not-often-discussed problems posed by climate change: the dramatic increase in the use of air conditioners in some of the world’s most rapidly developing countries. Elizabeth Rosenthal outlined the sobering state of affairs in the New York Times earlier this month:

In 2007, only 11 percent of households in Brazil and 2 percent in India had air-conditioning, compared with 87 percent in the United States, which has a more temperate climate, said Michael Sivak, a research professor in energy at the University of Michigan. “There is huge latent demand,” Mr. Sivak said. “Current energy demand does not yet reflect what will happen when these countries have more money and more people can afford air-conditioning.” He has estimated that, based on its climate and the size of the population, the cooling needs of Mumbai alone could be about a quarter of those of the entire United States, which he calls “one scary statistic.”

The Endesa Pavilion is doubly efficient in this regard: it not only generates its own electricity instead of sucking it from the grid, but its season-aware design means that it’s working in concert with the climate it inhabits, instead of creating a desired indoor climate independently, energy cost be dammed.

Any architectural design that incorporates sustainable elements is better than one that doesn’t, but the Pavilion is a striking reminder that not all sustainable designs are created equal. In fact, a good deal of the green architecture we see seems to treat sustainability as an afterthought: we design a house, just like we always have, and then we see how we can tweak it to be kinder to the environment. “[The] construction industry is very slow, with strong inertias,” Rubio told Co.Design, “but markets [need to] reinvent themselves in crisis situations.”

But as Rubio pointed out to me, green technologies are still developing at a rapid pace, and new structures need to be nimble enough to update alongside those technologies. “Photovoltaics … are developing fast, what today is advanced maybe could be outdated or not efficient enough in five years,” he explained. Future structures “will be something more dynamic, devices you upgrade continuously, like you do with your phone, updating your OS each year.”

Broadly speaking, right now, we’re adapting green tech to buildings as we’ve always understood them, when what we need to be doing is rethinking buildings from the ground up. Or maybe from the sun down.

All photos courtesy Adria Goula

Animated GIFs That Show Cool Kids Made Of Stardust

13 Sep

 

These animated GIFs are fantastic. If you have seen my other posts on animated GIFs you’ll probably know I have a slight obsession with them at the moment. These show people with stardust, random yes but they are still amazing photography and animation. Like my other posts if they don’t work straight away give them a few moments or click on the actual image and they should work.

Taken from fastcodesign.com

“THE TEXAS-BASED PHOTOGRAPHER IGNACIO TORRES CREATES OTHERWORLDLY IMAGES THAT CAPTURE WHAT WE’RE MADE OF: STARDUST

 

For decades, scientists have known that we–along with everything else on the planet–contain bits of stardust. That bit of real-life magic has made its way into countless lines of poetry and one horrible Moby song. It is also the basis for Ignacio Torres’s Stellar project, a series of animated GIFs picturing men and women seemingly floating amid sparkling star particles.

The Texas-based photographer says that his interest in “our celestial ancestry” began in college, where he took several astronomy courses and started to read and watch Carl Sagan’s Cosmos series. “At the same time,” Torres tells Co.Design, “I was obsessed with the stylistic imagery inAlejandro Jodorowsky films, which mostly consisted of desert landscapes. So he decided to combine the two–recruiting friends to be photographed among cacti in El Paso while being pelted with baking flour and confetti. “The process of creating the imagery was an adventure in itself,” he writes. “It was always a battle against time because I was relying on the brevity of the sunsets to create the right mood.”

To achieve the 3-D effect, Torres used stereoscopy, shooting four images from different angles and then compiling them into a single animation that creates the illusion of depth. The movement, according to the artist, “serves as a visual metaphor to the spatial link we share with stars as well as their separateness through time.” The floating quality belies the more mundane considerations of the setup: “The most difficult part,” Torres says, “is getting the models to jump at the exact time that the flour and confetti are thrown at them.”